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Showing posts from October, 2014

Economics isn't about what is fair...

Yesterday, I reminded my undergraduate economics students that modern economics, with its quantitative bias, is not about what is "fair" in life. While we can use economics to identify what isn't "fair" and how to better allocate resources, at its core economics is the study of efficiently allocating scarce resources. Math is not moral; it is an amoral aspect of economics that should be informed by philosophical inquiries.

For example, quantitative economics can answer when a person is "unproductive" and "inefficient" within the system. But, economics does not answer if it is moral to reallocate resources from the unproductive to either the currently or potentially productive members of a community. Raw numbers tell us the money spent on extending the last year or two of life might be best spent on educating the young. But is that the right way to approach problems?

Economic models do not tell us if stock market gains driven by low intere…

Inflation that Isn't... Why?

Where's the inflation? Where's the run-up in bond rates?

Despite high debt, unsustainable long-term social spending, unfunded pension liabilities, and numerous other fiscal challenges, the U.S. bond market is strong and interest rates remain low.

Companies are facing increasing energy costs, unstable global situations, falling unemployment, rising minimum wages in larger cities, and a regulatory landscape that has shifted.

The Tea Party and the Occupy movements aren't exactly in the mood to reform corporate taxes, and the politicians reliant on both extremes aren't going to collaborate to improve the business climate in any meaningful way. (Yes, there are areas of agreement among most economists, across the political and theoretical spectrum, that good policy isn't good politics.)

If business costs and risks are rising, prices should be rising. With all levels of government fiscally unsound (and ungovernable), bond vigilantes should be circling. In theory, in…

Even in the richest 3%, there's a growing wealth gap

The "one percent" of income earners, and even the one-tenth of top one percent, might be the only segment in the United States that has caught up to pre-recession income and growth levels. Though I never support wealth redistribution, clearly the opportunity curve is… broken. If the middle and upper-middle class cannot advance, it's unlikely the economy can move forward for all citizens.
Even in the richest 3%, there's a growing wealth gap

Robert Frank | @robtfrank
Friday, 5 Sep 2014 | 3:13 PM ET CNBC.com

America's millionaire population hasn't grown significantly in 10 years, according to new government data, suggesting that not everyone at the top is benefiting from the recovery.

The latest Surveys of Consumer Finance from the Federal Reserve paints the familiar picture of widening income inequality in America. The wealthiest 3 percent of households control 54.4 percent of the nation's wealth, up from 51.8 percent in 2009.

But the gains are highly concen…